[griffon_nivernais] – Photos, Characteristics, Information – Dog Breeds - Royal Canin
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[griffon_nivernais]

The scourge of wild boar

Breed
FCI-6
Scenthounds and Related Breeds
FCI
breed_picture

Original Name : Griffon Nivernais

Tipo : Braccoid

Otros nombres : Nivernais

Tamaño del macho : 21½-24½ inches

Tamaño de la hembra : 21-23½ inches

Grado de cuidado :

País de origen : France

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The Griffon Nivernais is an outstanding hunter. Its bravery and initiative are very practical in small packs on wild boar hunts, which it can be easily taught to track. These dogs can be a little headstrong and independent, however, so they should be brought to heel from a very early age.

Cabeza+

Very clean, light without being small, a little long but not excessively so, parallel lines of skull and muzzle.

lupoid

Cuerpo+

Straight topline, slightly prominent withers, fairly long, solid back that is rather narrow, sustained and well muscled, though the muscles are not easily discernible.

lupoid

Pelaje+

Black overlay, meaning the hair tips are darker than the roots.

lupoid

Orejas+

Hanging, supple, rather fine, medium width, turned slightly inward at the tip, fairly hairy, half-long.

lupoid

Cola+

Set a little high, hairier in the middle.

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Pelo+

Long, shaggy, bushy, fairly strong and rough, never woolly or curly.

lupoid

The ancestors of the Griffon Nivernais may be the hounds used by the ancient Gauls and gray Saint-Louis dogs. It was very popular for two centuries, before being dropped from the royal hunting packs in the reign of Francis I (who commissioned the building of the Louvre). The breed fell into obscurity, but was eventually reconstructed from a small gene pool.The Griffon Nivernais has a very distinctive tousled coat with beard. A particularly friendly companion, it is a very hardy, robust breed, with clean legs and muscles built more for stamina than for speed.

¿Lo sabías?

The Griffon Nivernais is a scenthound mostly employed to hunt wild boar, generally in packs, although it can operate alone.

PHOTOS

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